Famous Scientists we Lost in 2020 – Everyday Science
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Famous Scientists we Lost in 2020

Famous Scientists we Lost in 2020
scientists who died in 2020

Scientists who have left us this year will always shine as shining stars in the sky of science to the world because of their work. At everydayscience.blog, we bid farewell and pays a tribute to the researchers who help along with the fields of molecular biology, virology, and immunology with their researches. Here is a list of scientists who died in 2020.  

scientists who died in 2020
Scientists who died in 2020

Jeff McKnight (1984-2020)

Jeff McKnight was a molecular biologist at the University of Oregon who died in October at the age of 36.

Jeff McKnight
Jeff McKnight

Jeff’s research was on chromatin, a mixture of DNA and proteins that work to make copies of DNA and genes. He was one of the few scientists in the world to work on eradicating the disease by altering the DNA structure. When Jeff formally launched his lab in 2016, he said it was his dream to find a cure for diseases caused by chromatin anomalies, such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and Huntington’s. In the months leading up to his death from lymphoma cancer, the man shared his research on social media about the diagnosis and treatment of his disease to help other scientists around the world who are working on it. As Jeff did, he helped humanity as much as he could.

Stanley Cohen (1922-2020)

Stanley Cohen, a Nobel Prize-winning biochemist who researched cell growth factors, died in February. He was 97 years old.

Stanley Cohen
Stanley Cohen

His job is not only to divide cells, but he has also developed a number of drugs used in cancer. In 1986, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine for his work with fellow scientist Rita Levy Montalcini. Cohen discovered a protein that causes abnormal cell division in the body and helped diagnose cancer. Since the discovery, cancer drugs have been developed with growth factors in mind.

 Angelika Amon (1967-2020)

Angelika Amon was a cell biologist at MIT who died on October 29 due to cancer.

Angelika Amon
Angelika Amon

Angelica researched how the cell psyche and its irregular distribution can cause cancer. In her Ph.D. research at the University of Vienna and her post-PhD research at MIT, Angelica, with the help of yeast and bees, proved how certain proteins and enzymes in a body cause cell division. Angelica later began research on aneuploidy. This branch of biology deals with the unnecessary number and distribution of chromosomes. Thus this intelligent scientist devoted his life to the diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

James Taylor (1979-2020)

James Taylor, 40, was died in April.

James Taylor
James Taylor

He was an intelligent man who created the bioinformatics platform in his doctoral research; James created a genomic data-sharing platform called the Galaxy Project, which has been used in more than 10,000 biology journals. Thanks to an extraordinary scientist, James Tyler’s program of data sharing and analyzing is also being used in the epidemic of code.

Also Read: Top 10 Inventions that Changed the World

  William Dement (1928-2020)

The scientist who built the first clinic to treat sleep disorders was passed away in June at the age of 91 years. 

William Dement
William Dement

William Dement was the first scientist to diagnose sleep disorders. In 1950, he did research on sleep science and dreaming at the University of Chicago, and later taught at Stanford University for fifty years. There he continued his research on sleep deprivation problems and their treatment and established the Stanford Sleep Medicine Center, which later became the National Institute for Research on Sleep Disorders. By pointing out problems such as sleep deprivation, sleep disorders, and lack of oxygen to the brain during sleep, Dement has positively affected the lives of millions of people.

 Wendy Havran (1955-2020)

Wendy Havran is the scientist who used gamma delta to heal wounds. She died on January 20 this year at the age of 64.

Wendy Havran
Wendy Havran

During her graduation, Wendy chose the field after being inspired by John Camber, an immunologist at Duke University, who had previously been involved in medicine. She says she suddenly had the idea and then she couldn’t stop herself from going into the field. She actually wanted to know how the body’s immune system actually works. In his doctoral research, he looked at the effects of monoclonal antibodies that affect a particular part of the body on T cells, and later in his post-doctoral dissertation, he worked on gamma delta T cells and found out for the first time. These cells are common in the human skin and intestines, and in order to understand how important they are in the body, they made a map to understand the healing of wounds and she worked day and night in her lab researching how to prevent tumors.

Noel Rose (197-2020)

Immunologist and microbiologist Noel Rose gained fame at a very young age by discovering immunity.

Noel Rose
Noel Rose

Prior to their work, it was thought that the body did not develop a defense system against itself, But as a teenage student in medicine, Rose proved that when rabbits were given anti-thyroid antibodies, their healthy thyroid was destroyed. Over the next few decades, he devoted himself to exploring the many diseases and causes of autoimmune diseases, including his eight hundred and eighty research articles and an extensive collection of books.

Adding a whole new chapter to the book of medicine, this scientist can undoubtedly be called the founder of the automated defense system. This great and selfless man died on July 30 at the age of 92.

Related Article: Galileo Discoveries: What did Galileo Galilei invent and discover?

Phillip Leder (1934-2020)

Phillip Leder was a Molecular geneticist at Harvard Medical School whose work is based on molecular bio which covers important areas such as the body’s immune system and cancer.

Phillip Leder
Phillip Leder

During his postdoctoral fellowship in 1960, Philip discovered a technique that proved that there are three nucleotides that makeup amino acids. This was a unique discovery of its kind. In an interview in 2012, Philip recalls that he used to fall asleep thinking about the next day’s work and experiences, and his passion used to wake him up before dawn and take him to the laboratory, even though work The burden was enough, but the knowledge, experience, and satisfaction gained during that time was much more than that. After discovering the protein-coding of genes, Philip mapped a complete mammalian gene and created the connected genes, thus making genetic engineering possible and crediting Philip with creating the first cancer cell in the lab ۔ In 1981, Philip founded the Department of Genetics at Harvard Medical School and ran the institution day and night for 25 years. Although he died in February at the age of 85, Philip’s name will always remain in the field of genetics.

Flossie Wong-Staal (1946-2020)

Microbiologist and virologist Flossie Wong-Staal was the first scientist to study humans and discover the first clone of HIV. The 73-year-old scientist died of pneumonia in July. Flossie’s research first proved the hypothesis of scientists that retroviruses cause cancer. Dr. Flossie and his team developed the first human retrovirus (HTLV-1).

Flossie Wong-Staal
Flossie Wong-Staal

Modeled Together with his colleague Robert Gallo, he spent twenty years researching AIDS and printing more than a hundred Uppers. His work has been the most used for reference since 1980. In the 1980s, as the number of AIDS cases increased, all scientists worked day and night to discover and treat it. Flossie was the first scientist to develop a clone of HIV and began a genetic study. Effective treatment methods can be discovered. He left his fellow Gallo Cancer Research Lab at the National Institute and set up an AIDS Research Lab in 1990, where he spent the rest of his life studying and discovering a cure for the AIDS virus. AIDS patients are still treated in the way he described them.

Lynika Strozier (1985-2020)

Lynika Strozier being a leading researcher and biologist at the Straussier Field Museum, was also an instructor at Malcolm. She died of the coronavirus on June 7 at the age of 35.

Lynika Strozier
Lynika Strozier

Lynika Strozier has been interested in birds since she was a student, which led to her discovery of many species after testing her DNA. In her research at the university, Lynika identified 200 different species of birds with their DNA in Madagascar, which was previously thought to contain only three species. It was certainly a unique and very high-level work of its kind. In addition, this intelligent girl discovered so many species of birds that because of their structure and shape, no one had ever felt like a different species before. His reputation for handwriting and the ability to skillfully separate genetic material from old samples made him famous. She was more capable of extracting DNA from even the smallest amount of 15-year-old dried plant material than any of her colleagues at the Field Museum Lab, and everyone was appreciative of this excellent scientist for her delicate and complex work.

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